Archive for the ‘Bodywork’ Category

Settling in

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

The big move is behind me. I have been working in the new space for a week, every day adding a little more of this and adjusting that. I have a couple more things to take care of, but it’s almost home.

I like it more than I thought I would. I’ve traded seagulls for train whistles, and crazy afterthought bathrooms for easy listening in the elevators.

Afternoon light.
Afternoon light.
Small but cozy.
Small but cozy.
Night view.
Night view.

My hope is that as I settle into the space, it will become more and more restful and welcoming for you.


Friday, September 5th, 2014

August 15, 2014 marked 21 years in the Maud building for me. I was 22 when I signed that lease, fresh out of massage school and super tired of being a bike messenger. My brother had asked me if I wanted to fill up some space on the back of the Stranger (where he was one of two ad reps) with a free ad, and I needed a place to practice when people started calling. I remember the first client I had in my new space– a friend of a friend.

It was never my intention to end up in Pioneer Square, but the spaces I was looking at in the Capitol Hill and Belltown areas felt cramped and ugly, and this little room had a tall ceiling, an exposed brick wall, and a lovely big window. I paid $110/month for the tiny room I have been using as my office, enough room for a massage table, a cabinet for my sheets, and that was about it. When I got my Structural Integration certification in 1997, I expanded into the spacious suite I’ve been using ever since.

Pioneer Square has historically been a sketchy neighborhood–like, right from the start– and yet I have never felt unsafe here. I have watched the Square struggle to balance high rent retail with a high percentage of homeless services, suffer the blows of the Nisqually earthquake and the big Recession, endure a reputation of violence and stink, and see it now emerging into the new “Foodie Heaven” advertised on the buses, a place with more people living in it and working in it and more development on the way.

When my landlords told me last month that it was time for them to occupy the whole building, I immediately began looking for my new space. As I walked around Pioneer Square, my gut sat low and sluggish, sad and heavy. The rents were predictably much higher than what I have been paying (a fact I have always appreciated), and the spaces were uninspiring, despite being in beautiful old buildings. I went to check out a new building in SODO and my gut sat up a bit, got lighter, more curious, despite the awkwardness of the location and the smaller size of the room. How strange.

So, I am leaving Pioneer Square. My gut told me to, and we are tight like that. I don’t know what is in store for me, and I doubt that my new space in SODO will be mine for more than a couple of years, but I have a feeling that this move is the beginning of something good, the “next thing”, potentially amazing.

I have one more week here as I write, and I am enjoying the creaking floors, the terrible noise bleed, the comfort and familiarity of it all. I have grown up here, and I will always be grateful for the opportunities that the Maud Building has provided.


Improv/e Yourself!

Monday, September 16th, 2013
This is from a friend whose heart is good and ability to be silly is even better:
Have you ever wanted to take an improv class but have no desire to be a comedian? Come to this improv class for non-performers!

The class is designed to help you:

– connect fully to the immense creativity in your unconscious

– reduce negative internal self-talk
– get out of your head
– speak more confidently with other people
– tap into your intuition

The class will take place in a comfortable environment with up to 15 people help you let loose.

One time only reduced rate, just $15. Pay at the door.

7pm – 8:30pm Thursday 9/26/13
University Heights Center
Room #108

Confirm by emailing:

or call Ben Lidgus at:
206 462 0654

Please pass this email along to anyone you think might be interested.
Ben Lidgus has been performing improv since 1998 with many different groups.  He has been teaching improv since 2007.  He holds a Master’s degree in teaching and taught at Garfield High School for 2 years.

20 Years!

Monday, August 5th, 2013



This month marks my 20th anniversary in practice!

I have been in the historic Maud Building the entire time, first just in the little room I now use as my office, and then expanding into what is now the treatment room in 1997.

I spent some time this weekend creating the invitation to a celebration I’ll be having on September 13, as you see above. I went back to hand-drawing, something I used to do a whole lot and have not done much of in recent years. If you are a client and I have your address, you will get one of these in the mail in the next few weeks.

I also scanned in old mailers and ads for a slideshow I’ll be playing at the party– what a trip down memory lane! These relics document my progress from an extremely earnest 22-year-old just trying to get a foothold in her chosen trade, through years of learning and into the somewhat more world-weary “Sorry I’m so booked” phase (that one goes on and on, lucky me), and from totally low-tech hand-drawn ads to computer-designed mailers featuring pictures of my kid.

I have always felt that it was important to put my self into my advertising and promotional materials, since what I have to offer necessarily comes through my being. Every mailer has been an opportunity to reflect on what I do and why, where I am going, and how I plan to get there.

Although my original intention was to use a massage license to get myself a college education, what I actually did was use it to get myself a higher education, one which has helped me be the person I want to be in the world and that has given me a sense of contributing to the greater good. My work keeps me humble while it nourishes my soul, it demands that I stay right with myself so that I can be present with others, and there will never be an end to learning as long as I am willing. That’s some good stuff– Thank you for allowing me to do it!

Here’s to at least 20 more years of growing, discovering, deepening, and enjoying my work. All my best, Bevin


Fascial Research

Monday, April 1st, 2013

This is a longish video from a German TV documentary about back pain. Good stuff!

Connecting body to Earth and energy

Monday, July 30th, 2012

Dr. James Oschman has been a friend of the Rolfing community for a long time. He has theorized that fascia is the primary energy conductor of the body, and written a couple of books explaining how “energy medicine” is a real thing and not just an airy-fairy new-age wish.
This article is about receiving positive electrons, which are powerful antioxidants, from the surface of the Earth by walking barefoot outside, a practice called “Earthing”.
One of the primary goals of a Structural Integration series is to help people find support from the earth– or the ground– so that they can find the length that comes from having a nicely rooted foundation. Waking up the soles of the feet to sensation and discovering their inherent ability to adapt to the varied surfaces of the earth gives us an all-over feeling of greater security and lightness of movement.
Here, Mary Bond, a wonderful Rolf Movement teacher, has several exercises designed to wake up the feet and lower leg.

Old Wounds, New Progress

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

I had a great experience today in my own “healing process”.

I have been recently moved to tackle (again) a tricky knee I’ve been struggling with since about the age of 13 or 14. For the past year or so it has kept me from riding my bike and doing my yoga, as both activities created an all-day ache in both my knee and my sacroiliac joint which was distracting at best and truly painful at worst. I had arthroscopic surgery as a high school junior, I did Physical Therapy exercises both originally and again a few years ago, I tried to strengthen my core with Pilates, I have had excellent bodywork, and thought really hard about what the freaking deal was, with no real success.

Over the past few months I have been working with Michael Hahn who is an excellent Visceral Manipulation therapist here in Seattle. His work with the subtle connections of the finer fascial structures of my body have been fascinating and helpful– an extremely gentle session in my psoas/ilacus on that pesky right side felt like it was the beginning of a new possibility for that leg/hip/knee.

Michael encouraged me to go see Sue Knowles at Movement Systems Physical Therapy, and I felt ready, so I did.

I always enjoy a good opportunity to learn something new from a practitioner with a different skill set. With the first session, I got to try some new ways of standing and walking that were awkward, but interesting. I could also feel that what she was asking me to do wasn’t completely possible for my body– I knew enough to know I wasn’t doing it exactly right, but I did the best I could, and brought questions to my session today. She could see the difficulty I was having and after some testing and walking she began to do some gentle fascial work in my lower leg, asking me to let the leg melt down as she worked. (That’s something I would do!)

I tried, and could feel the resistance in my body. My Somatic Experiencing training tells me that resistance like that is containing something, usually something difficult, uncomfortable, probably something that once overwhelmed me and felt like it needed to be contained. I worked at it, feeling into that resistance while Sue continued to gently work my leg and foot.

I told her that there was a deep anxiety in that leg, and she agreed. She had me lay supine on the table for a bit more work, and in that position I continued to explore the resistance in my leg, the holding I could feel right up next to my bones. Gentle waves of sadness started washing through me; I mentioned them and Sue asked whether the knee had prevented me from doing things I would have wanted to do in my youth, or at other points in my life. “Yes, I suppose it did, but this feels more like vulnerability than loss”, I said. A couple of little tears worked their way out of my eyes, but I was maintaining curiosity, staying present with the desire to release my deeply anxious leg into a new way of supporting me.

Next she had me try a new exercise, a relatively simple hands-and-knees exploration of fine motor control in the hip, asking my femur to track straight back as I moved towards child’s pose with my sitz bones wide, and in trying to get there with her, I was suddenly completely overwhelmed with a distinctly young teenaged feeling of absolute confusion, fear, and misery. I was somehow facing my stepmom, the social realm, my own awkward existence and the need to justify it, and I had to stop the exercise to allow those feelings to move through me. Sue was kind enough to give me some space to do that, while remaining present enough that I didn’t feel abandoned or weird.

After a few minutes, I felt like trying again. This time, I could move into the exercise much more easily, the confusion and pain was gone, and my femur simply slid into place, going almost all the way down correctly where before I could only go about 25% of the way before being pulled off track.

That felt pretty huge to me. I have been abstractly aware for a long time that that leg contained some measure of my own sense of vulnerability, but being intellectually aware only goes so far. Having a skilled practitioner ask me to move in a very specific way that confused me, and allowing myself to experience my own vulnerability within that confusion, THAT might get me somewhat farther. I hope so, anyway; I’d really like to ride my bike to work again.

I’ll keep you posted. bk

Movement Cues from Mary Bond

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Mary Bond is the Chair of the Rolf Institute’s Rolf Movement program. She has authored two books, Balancing Your Body and The New Rules of Posture, and numerous magazine articles on bodywork and movement. Her teaching emphasis is on the practical sensory and movement awareness that contributes to sustainable improvements in mind and body functioning.

Here is a preview for a DVD that should be available November 1, 2011 that shows how to do a regular household chore with less strain:

More on Fascia

Monday, October 10th, 2011

This is from Dr. Robert Schleip in Germany, a Rolfer who has been scientifically investigating fascia for many years:

S.I. Client Handbook, circa 1997

Friday, August 26th, 2011

This PDF is the Client Handbook I wrote while completing basic training at the Guild for Structural Integration. It’s very thorough in its explanation of the process, and very earnest in tone. The file had to be broken into two pieces because it was BIG:
Client Handbook Part 1
Client Handbook Part 2