Bevin Keely, LMP

Using your Health Insurance for my services

At this time I am taking new clients with Regence Blue Shield, First Choice Health Network, and United Health Care. First Choice and UHC clients can continue to book appointments from the regular service menu, as can L&I and PIP claims.

To book an appointment that will be paid for with your Regence health insurance, please choose “Insurance Session 60 Minutes” from the service menu on my booking site. You will then have to choose “Insurance A.” as your provider- this is still me, using a different provider name so I can distinguish between services.  There are a limited number of these sessions in my schedule, so it may be several months before an opening shows up on the calendar. You can also join the cancellation list (on the sidebar) for openings that come available.

For all clients using their health insurance, I ask that you have a prescription for massage from your doctor, regardless of whether your plan says you need one. Your prescription must include the proper ICD-10 diagnosis code/s and the number of sessions prescribed. Some Regence plans require pre-authorization for massage therapy treatment. Please click here to determine whether this affects you.

I no longer work as an Aetna or a Premera provider, but I can furnish you with the proper paperwork to get my work reimbursed at the out-of-network rate if you wish.

Who do you go to?

I get asked a lot who I get my healing and helping work from. I am lucky enough to have some great relationships going with a variety of folks who do different things, all of which are hugely beneficial to my health and well being. I have a quick-reference list here, but if you want more details about these practitioners, read on:

My most regular massage trades are with Christina Pappas, who works on Vashon Island and in Pioneer Square. She’s a craniosacral therapist and also does some lovely deep Swedish massage.

My friend Eve DeRooy is another excellent craniosacral therapist who also gives a lovely massage, and she has extensive training in trauma healing with Somatic Experiencing and the Organic Intelligence models.

Michael Hahn is someone I send people to when it seems likely that their finer structural relationships could use some attention. People who have had extensive gut issues or multiple accidents or surgeries… or sometimes folks whose problems just don’t respond to the work I do the way I would hope or expect- I send them to Michael.

For Structural Integration work I most often trade with Kate Bradfield. It is so lovely to get her eyes and hands on my situation and get some help!

My Rolfing mentor Ron McComb is still at it, practicing a few days a month in Seattle. Though I have not had a chance to connect with him for many years, he has been practicing for almost my entire life and has a ton of wisdom to share.

I’m currently seeing Jared Kohler for some unique chiropractic care- no popping and cracking, but tapping, vibrating, and stretching with precision adjustments of the atlas/axis of the spine, so gentle you hardly feel it happening.

I’ve also seen Mike Ross for the more traditional cracking business, though he does a lot more soft tissue work with Active Release Technique than cracking, and is very rehab-oriented. He is great for giving you exercises to do on your own.

For the past year and a half or so my body has been telling me that my diet could use some adjusting– not because of middle-aged spread, though that is certainly of concern- but because of discomfort and inflammation. I will be spending some time with Michelle Schwartz to help strategize myself into greater comfort again.

I had a great experience with Movement Systems Physical Therapy and Neal Goldberg helped me fine-tune my bike fit.

Gay at Kinesia Pilates did a series of private sessions with me that have been crucial in my current quest for strength and stability in my lower back.

Everybody needs help. I am so grateful to have these excellent practitioners to turn to, and always interested to hear who you go to when you need it!

Links for further Research and Information

More information about the work I have studied, and where I studied it:

  • International Association of Structural Integrators
  • Guild for Structural Integration
  • Rolf Institute
  • Dr. Rolf herself!
  • Trauma Healing
  • Resources

    As a quick reference to the people and places I go to get myself taken care of, or have heard great things about from trusted sources, I offer you this list. I have gone into more detail about them here.

    Bodywork/Massage
    Christina Pappas– Craniosacral Therapy, deep tissue Swedish massage
    Eve DeRooy– Craniosacral Therapy, Swedish massage, Somatic Experiencing/Organic Intelligence
    The team at Banya 5– for sooner-rather-than-later needs

    Bodywork/Structural
    Kate Bradfield– Certified Advanced Rolfer
    Michael Hahn– Visceral Manipulation, Hellerwork
    Ron McComb– Certified Advanced Rolfer
    Lisa Torrison O’Neil– Structural Integration Practitioner

    Chiropractic Care
    Jared Kohler– super gentle, does very specific atlas/axis work as well
    Michael Ross– Active Release Technique and more traditional cracking

    Movement
    8 Limbs Yoga Centers
    Kinesia Pilates
    Vitality Pilates
    Heroics Personal Training
    Crossfit RE

    Physical Therapy
    Heidi Gans
    Footworks Physical Therapy
    Movement Systems Physical Therapy

    Nutrition
    Michelle Schwartz

    Primary Care
    Dean Chier, MD– Seattle Healing Arts Center has a great reputation.

    Thrive Together Healing Arts

    I have had this dream for a reaaaallly long time to get a thing going with other folks who do healing work in various disciplines. I’ve spent hours working on business plans and crunching numbers and as yet the time has not been right and the plan has not become more than a dream, but I did get excited a couple of years ago and set up an LLC and bought myself some url’s. Thought I’d point them here for awhile, while the dream drifts around in the ethers… here’s the nutshell:

    Thrive Together Healing Arts is a collective wellness center currently in the idea phase of existence.

    Thrive Together sustains a field of rejuvenating energy, invites you to feel better just by walking in. It is a collective of offices housing 4-7 independent practitioners of varying healing arts, sharing resources where useful. It is peaceful without being precious, friendly and engaging and respectful in its presentation.

    Underneath all the struggle and strain, we are doing just fine; this place will remind us of that.

    We are a Limited Liability Company owned by one of the independent practitioners of Thrive Together Healing Arts.  Although other practitioners are not owners in the LLC, collaboration, collective responsibility and respect are keys to sustaining the common goal of Thriving Together.

    Stack Your Bones

    I just found this little gem, an embodiment/movement practice in app and book form put together by fellow Guild graduate Ruthie Fraser. I have downloaded the app and am itching to explore!

    http://www.stackyourbones.com

    Only Love Changes Hate

    “Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”

    ― Martin Luther King Jr., A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches

    This amazing story has been on my mind in recent weeks. It tells the personal experience of a man confronted with hateful threats and turning the situation around to truly change someone’s heart. An excellent listen.

    http://snapjudgment.org/rabbi-and-kkk

    Help for the Rotator Cuff

    Awhile back I had a whole rash of people coming in with the same kind of rotator cuff issues. It inspired me to look for something they could do themselves to help with what is clearly a common problem.

    These “most famous on the internet” physical therapists have some basic tests for you to see if you are dealing with an Impingement issue here. If you ARE, then you can do these exercises for making space around the impingement, and these for strengthening and stabilizing.

    It is my experience that doing nothing and hoping that a persistent rotator cuff issue will just go away on its own is not likely to work. Massage/bodywork can sometimes help get things back on track, but truly doing something about it on the regular– like, really really regular–has a tendency to help. I have a funky shoulder that pretty much needs me to do a set of simple exercises three times a week on an ongoing basis to be happy. It helps! Not doing them makes my shoulder hurt again after not too long.

    I recommend that people with sharp pains in their shoulder joints get themselves a good PT and then do what they are told!

    Help for the neck

    A client just asked me if there was something he could do to help his chronically stiff and achey neck on his own. Of course! I made a short playlist of YouTube videos to help this goal.

    First, my Somatic Experiencing training tells me that orienting is hugely important for the neck, as the desire to point our most-used information-gathering tools at objects and scenes of interest is crucial to our sense of safety, and that desire can help unlock movement potential.

    Next, from Mary Bond, a Rolfing Movement teacher, some physical cues to help ease the subtle movements at the top of the spine.

    Finally, if you are looking for a slightly longer exploration, a short neck-releasing Awareness Through Movement class by David Zemach-Bersin of the Feldenkrais Institute.

    Movement is life! When it comes to the neck, the more subtle the release, the more powerful– if you can get the strong muscular ribbons on all sides of your spine to let go, even just a little bit, the big movers will have more freedom to let go, too.

    The Polyvagal Theory

    I’m putting this here so that I know where to find it when I need a refresher!

    The Polyvagal theory as described by Dr. Stephen Porges helps us to understand our physiological responses to stress. Knowing why our bodies do what they do can be SUCH A RELIEF for our minds, which love to find meaning for the states we find ourselves in, even when those states don’t match the current environment. This is particularly useful information for people with trauma histories, whose bodies might be telling stories from times past that make the present difficult to fully enjoy.